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Is it viable to freezeapple pulp in advance?

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Postby Armelodie » Mon Jul 27, 2009 10:53 pm

Hi all
My tree was invaded by moth/catterpillars so i saved what was left and froze the pulp...

Is there any problems with using this pulp after a few months in the freezer?

Pity cos it was a wierd type of apple,tastes like an eater and cooker at the same time!!
Is there any way of finding out what type of apple it is? Although,tree is full of caterpillars now so might just chop it down and start again...reckon I'd have to put a tonne of chemicals on it next year to keep it going.

Thanks
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Postby Justin » Tue Jul 28, 2009 1:44 pm

Armelodie wrote:Hi all
Is there any problems with using this pulp after a few months in the freezer?

Not at all. In fact, freezing the pulp will improve its juice yield. The cell walls will have burst and the press will hence be easier.

Armelodie wrote:Pity cos it was a wierd type of apple,tastes like an eater and cooker at the same time!!

Usually, I'm reliably informed, sweet apples don't make great cider. Problem is with a sweet apple, there's just so much sugar and that will ferment to dryness. To retain some depth, a blend of apple types is recommended. Not sure exactly the recommended mix, but 40% sweet, 40% sharp and 20% bittersharp. French cider is 50% bittersharp, 40% sweet and 10% sharp. Crab apples are good, by the way, if you can't get bittersharps. Proper crab apples (malus sylvestri or malus evereste) mind.

Armelodie wrote:Is there any way of finding out what type of apple it is?

Best of luck. Only way I've found is to hire an expert and pay the man. Seedsavers in Clare have stopped but you might contact them. They might have some info on where you can go.
Armelodie wrote:Although, tree is full of caterpillars now so might just chop it down and start again...reckon I'd have to put a tonne of chemicals on it next year to keep it going.

Do not cut down the tree. The fauna can be removed much quicker than the time it takes a new planting to produce fruit. If you want to go totally organic have a chat to someone in a garden centre. They'll advice you on what you can spray. If you're not concerned about being totally organic, a fruit pesticide would be easily applied. Again, talk to your garden centre guys. An apple tree will take two years before you get fruit and then it will be a few more years before you get enough of a crop to fill your 23L bucket (about 50-60Kg of apples, in my experience)


/JD
Bibe ad vivae. mortuis non cervisa empto
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Postby donnchadhc » Tue Jul 28, 2009 1:52 pm

Justin wrote:Usually, I'm reliably informed, sweet apples don't make great cider. Problem is with a sweet apple, there's just so much sugar and that will ferment to dryness.
/JD


Exact same thing for wine, the grapes have to be acidy and not that sweet. Was talking to a friend of the family who runs a cave (vineyard) down in the south of france and he informs me that the best places for wine production are areas of relatively infertile land so the grapes do't get too sweet. If you think of it, the best areas for wine tend not to be the best places for land (think South of France, Southern Italy, Spain, Chile etc.)
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Postby Armelodie » Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:30 pm

Just to resurrect a very old thread, I did indeed use the frozen pulp eventually and also defrosted some for priming and it worked out perfect... thanks
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Postby Will_D » Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:19 pm

When I make apple wine as opposed to cider I nearly always freeze the whole apples first. Then when starting the fermentation process the apples break down very quickly. A pinch of Pectic enzyme helps as well. I then ferment "on the pulp" for a week or so then I press through a simple press ( no muslin bag )

Very simple.

( Also use the same for Rhubarb/Rasberries/Blackberries/Currants etc )

We only have a small amount per day ( like 100 gms but over a long season then we end up with a few kilos in't freezer

Will
Drinking:........HBC AG Kit American APA
Pri Fermenting:..AG Paulaner
Sec Fermenting:..LaTrappe Dubbel, AG Pilsner, Aventius AG Clone
Kegged: .........Cider
To Brew:.........HoorsLite, Hefe Dunkel, Dark Pilsner
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