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AG: St Paddy's Porridge: Bog Oak-Smoked Oatmeal Stout

Planning a brew day and need feedback, or want to share a recipe you've brewed? Post them up here (but read the sticky first :))

Postby Biertourist » Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:34 pm

This was the second brew on my new 3 vessel stainless "wunder-brewery" so I'm still getting some kinks worked out in the process but the plan was to make an Oatmeal stout to have for St. Patrick's day.

It was a pretty normal oatmeal stout recipe except that I added a good load of late hops and some bog oak-smoked malt that MAF gave me probably about a year ago now.

I also got busy towards the end of the boil kegging my previous batch so I kept extending the boil, holding off on adding my 10 minute addition so ultimately a 90 minute boil which REALLY concentrated the sugars and made it way stronger than I had planned.

Stats
OG: 1.070
FG (estimated): 1.017
Color: 26.5 SRM
ABV: 6.9%
IBUs: 53.8

Pre-boil volume: 7.5 gallons (28 liters)
Final Volume: 5.33 gallons (20 liters)

Note: I was attempting to make a Jamil sized batch where you have 7 gallons pre-boil in your kettle and end up with 6 gallons post-boil and with all your losses including trub and yeast bed you end up with 5 full gallons in the fermenter.


Grist
Crisp Marris Otter Pale Ale Malt: 4.5kg (10 lbs)
Rolled Oats: 450g (1 lb)
Crisp Pale Chocolate: 340g (3/4 lb)
Victory Malt, Briess: 340g (3/4 lb)
Caramel 80L Briess: 226g (1/2 lb)
Roasted Barley, Briess, 500L: 226g (1/2 lb)
Bog Oak Smoked Pale Malt: 200g

I meant to add 1/8th lb pale chocolate and 1/8th lb regular chocolate malt but measured out too much pale chocolate and threw it into the malt mill at my local home brew store so ultimately I'd say that this stout is less roasty than even an American Stout. You'll likely want more roast coming from somewhere.

This was a RIDICULOUSLY small quantity of smoked malt but its all that I had and it certainly added to the nose before I added the late hops.

Hopping
Columbus 13% AA: 90 min, 28g (1 oz)
Cascade 8.9% AA: 10 min, 28g (1 oz)

This makes for a VERY hoppy stout; just the way I like it.

Yeast/ Fermentation
I used the Rogue PacMan strain because I'm making it my house ale strain for a few months; I REALLY like how it ferments like lightening, is INCREDIBLY neutral, flocculates crystal clear, and leaves little fermentable sugars while still leaving a great maltiness and smooth mouth-feel. I think it's the perfect yeast strain for an oatmeal stout for this reason.

I repitched 1/2 cup of SUPER fresh yeast (I transferred the previous beer off of it 20 minutes before pitching it to this beer).

Within 12 hours of pitching it had filled up 1 gallon of head space, my entire blow-off tube, and a 1.5 liter flask and was overflowing krausen down my bathtub drain! I transfered 3/4 of a gallon to a demijohn so that I don't have any more beer losses.

I think I've got a winner here if the sample glass and fermentation smells are anything to gauge it on.


If you are going to crank up the smokiness, I'd recommend cranking down the hoppiness or vice versa.


It's so fantastic to be brewing again!


Adam
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Postby Biertourist » Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:47 pm

P.S. I cannot BELIEVE how important minimizing dead-space and having a REALLY slow, equally distributed sparge is when using a false bottom and fly sparging.

Batch sparging really is SOO much easier, faster, less inclined to result in off-flavors, AND the equipment is cheaper; really think hard before you decide to go with a false bottom and switch to fly sparging.

My first batch on this system I had something abysmal like 59% efficiency because I had a false bottom with a HUGE quantity of liquid under the false bottom (say 6 -7 liters) -even though I recirculated for the full 60 minute mash it didn't help much. This also meant that I had very little liquid left for sparging which is what really annihilated my efficiency. (almost like no-sparge brewing).

I drained the full mash tun before I started adding the sparge addition but my system doesn't include a sparge arm so I coudln't distribute the water evenly over the grain and certainly had huge amounts of channeling.

The key is to start adding your sparge water very slowly on top of the mash before yous start draining the first runnings out of the mash. You have to try to match the flow rates with your two ball valves so that you always keep a bit of liquid over the grain bed. My glass thermometer stuck into my mash worked as a level and allowed me to see which ball valve was outpacing the other and match them closely.

I also replaced my FB between last batch and this batch so that I only had 3.1 liters of dead space under my mashtun FB and therefore more liquid for sparge water (I mashed 0.5 liters per KG thicker, too.). I set the flow rate as slow as possible and sparged over 35 minutes (closer to an hour is ideal). I saw about a 20% increase in efficiency with these tweaks between my first batch on the system and my second; a 10 gallon batch would have a lower percentage of liquid under the false bottom and I should see even better efficiency.

Possibly some good lessons learned here for anyone who switches to a false bottom and fly sparging, anyway.


Adam
Last edited by Biertourist on Mon Feb 11, 2013 5:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Will_D » Sun Feb 10, 2013 9:07 pm

Hi Adam

Would love to see some photos of the brewery and a bit of a write up.

Knowing you, it is going to be the "Dogs*****x"
Drinking:........HBC AG Kit American APA
Pri Fermenting:..AG Paulaner
Sec Fermenting:..LaTrappe Dubbel, AG Pilsner, Aventius AG Clone
Kegged: .........Cider
To Brew:.........HoorsLite, Hefe Dunkel, Dark Pilsner
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Postby Biertourist » Mon Feb 11, 2013 5:03 am

P.S. Yes, I know the rule about "St Paddy's" and I gleeful broke it! -Why else would it be there?


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Postby Biertourist » Wed Feb 13, 2013 6:40 am

Ummm, guys, so far this thing is 72 hours into fermentation and it's down to 1.015, fermentation has slowed way down and it tastes.... DELICIOUS.

I'll also add that the malt was smoked whole and I crushed it to almost powder in a spice grinder / mortar and pistol thingy.

It has way more smoke flavor than I expected but it's still in the background. It's the closest thing to the Franciscan Well's made-only-one-time-despite-a-Beoir-beer-of-the-year-award Shandon Century Stout that I've ever had and I think I'm onto something with this recipe.

You really need to try this thing it's something special so far.

If anyone is coming to Seattle any time soon let me know and I'll send you back with a couple 750ml bottles to share at the next Beoir Thursday meet.


Adam
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Postby MAF » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:30 pm

Hi Adam,

delighted to hear malt I smoked has been used all the way over in Seattle!
The beer I brewed with that same malt had around 30% of the smoked malt in it. The phenols were way more heavy than any beech or birch smoked malts. Bog oak smoked malt is perfect for a dark beer such as the one you brewed, and great to hear the smokiness is coming through even though you only had a really small amount.
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Postby capillod » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:29 pm

Hey MAF where did u get the bog oak smoked malt? Did u smoke it yourself? If so how did u do it?
Im interested as we have tons of bog oak at home

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Postby MAF » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:53 pm

Cathal, I did indeed smoke my own. See post about it here and also blog post here

It's really simple to do - you should give it a go!
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Postby Biertourist » Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:00 pm

MAF wrote:Hi Adam,

delighted to hear malt I smoked has been used all the way over in Seattle!
The beer I brewed with that same malt had around 30% of the smoked malt in it. The phenols were way more heavy than any beech or birch smoked malts. Bog oak smoked malt is perfect for a dark beer such as the one you brewed, and great to hear the smokiness is coming through even though you only had a really small amount.


Thanks, MAF!

I was just delighted to have it to get to use it. It's turned out fantastic and it seems that because it's so phenolic that "less is more" much like when brewing with peat-smoked malt.


Adam
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Postby Biertourist » Thu Apr 04, 2013 11:44 pm

I'm entering this in my first ever competition.

It combines Washington's second largest BJCP judging competition with the US's largest Pro-Am competition to make one GIANT brewing competition.

http://www.wahomebrewers.org/competitio ... und-pro-am


I would've really liked to enter a nice small competition instead of this giant monstrosity but it is what it is.

I'm prepared to hate this process because I know that smoked malt in an Oatmeal stout is "not to style" for the BJCP half of the event but for the Pro-Am part of the event, it's the professional brewers themselves who judge the beer. -

Unfortunately, though the professional brewers don't want to brew beers with weird ingredients they can't get and I'm sure Bogoak-smoked malt is pretty much an impossibility.


This will probably be painful but I'm interested to see how a big competition works, anyway.


Adam
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Postby Biertourist » Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:18 pm

I've been thinking about what I would modify in this recipe and if I were to brew it again I would do everything exactly the same except I would increase the smoked malt percent by 50-100% and see how it tastes.

I finally have a beer recipe that I wouldn't tweak next time. This is the first recipe EVER that I can say that about.

Adam
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Postby Paddy Bubbles » Mon Apr 08, 2013 12:21 pm

Biertourist wrote:I'm prepared to hate this process because I know that smoked malt in an Oatmeal stout is "not to style" for the BJCP half of the event but for the Pro-Am part of the event, it's the professional brewers themselves who judge the beer.


Unfortunately, you're likely to score pretty low if you enter this in the "Oatmeal Stout" category even though it's a great beer. You'd be much better off entering this in "Cat. 22B - Other Smoked Beer".
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Postby Biertourist » Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:18 pm

Paddy Bubbles wrote:
Biertourist wrote:I'm prepared to hate this process because I know that smoked malt in an Oatmeal stout is "not to style" for the BJCP half of the event but for the Pro-Am part of the event, it's the professional brewers themselves who judge the beer.


Unfortunately, you're likely to score pretty low if you enter this in the "Oatmeal Stout" category even though it's a great beer. You'd be much better off entering this in "Cat. 22B - Other Smoked Beer".


Not if I don't mention that smoked malt is in it; the smoke is so so incredibly mellow and in the background you just wouldn't guess it if I didn't tell you.

I have no intent to sabotage myself. It would not go over well as a smoked beer given that there's not really any noticeable smokey notes.


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Postby Biertourist » Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:18 pm

My REAL problem is that I'm not sure I have 36 oz of this beer left in the keg... (That would be SO sad...)


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Postby Paddy Bubbles » Tue Apr 09, 2013 9:43 am

Biertourist wrote:Not if I don't mention that smoked malt is in it; the smoke is so so incredibly mellow and in the background you just wouldn't guess it if I didn't tell you.

I have no intent to sabotage myself. It would not go over well as a smoked beer given that there's not really any noticeable smokey notes.


Crafty! :) I want to do a smoked porter myself, with the peat-smoked malt just adding some complexity rather than being a full-on "campfire" beer. Any experience with the peat-smoked malt we get over here Adam? I'm thinking 100g/19l, a la "Stone Smoked Porter"..
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